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Human Kindness Projects

A kindness project is some form of giving to your community. It is deliberately developed, and performed by an individual, a team, a family, a class, or an entire school or youth group. We have found over the last 4 years that there is no end to the creative ideas that children and youth can imagine and turn into concrete action. We have a hard time keeping up with all the deliberate acts of kindness, however, we try to capture what we can in the kindness playbook. In addition, we will work with anyone to help shape a project that works in their community. We have found that simply emailing back and forth a couple of times, or a short phone call is all that is needed to help groups launch their own projects.

Deliberate Acts of Kindness

We've assembled a table for anyone who needs ideas for deliberate kind acts to perform, click here to view our Kindness Playbook. For those listed in the playbook that are underlined, we have further information on how you can plan for those activities. Contact us for more information and if you have any other suggestions. We would love to share your ideas.

Random Acts of Kindness

While deliberate acts of kindness require planning, it is also possible to perform random, unplanned acts of kindness consciously and intentionally. Here are some examples of random acts of kindness. They may include events ranging from an hour or two, to daily events.

Elementary School Students

  • Wave hello to a crossing guard
  • Sit next to someone at lunch who you don't usually talk to
  • Start a conversation with a new student or with a classmate who seems lonely etc.
  • Smile at 7 people
  • Pick up a piece of garbage and throw it away
  • Say “Thank you” to a crossing guard
  • Think of something good you did today and pat yourself on the back

Middle School Students

  • Ask students to perform an act of kindness for someone who helps them (e.g. cafeteria worker, teacher, crossing guard) and then write an essay describing their experience. They should include how it made them feel and the reaction of the person who received the kindness
  • Choose a story with a kindness theme and read it aloud or individually. Discuss or write about how the characters felt when they did something nice or had something nice done for them
  • Ask students to pick someone who has done something nice for them and write a thank you note (example: a tutor for helping them learn math facts, a nurse for bandaging an injury, etc.)
  • Slip a gratitude note in your friend’s backpack
  • Write a gratitude card and give it to someone who works at the school
  • Swap one of your unhealthy snacks for a healthy snack
  • Draw a picture and give it to someone you don’t know
  • Carry your friend’s books or bag to class
  • Learn to say “Hello” and “Thank you” in a new language (that someone speaks at your school)

High School Students

  • Write a thank you note for a mentor or someone who has influenced your life in a positive way
  • Kindness Talk: Contact people in the community who are actively promoting kindness and request that they visit your school for classroom discussions or an assembly
  • Kindness Show: Create a show about kindness and present it to elementary schools (e.g. a puppet show, music performance, play)
  • Sit with someone at lunch that you usually don’t speak with
  • Search for a joke and tell three people
  • Do a happy dance for someone
  • Walk or bike to school and help the environment
  • Make a bookmark, write kindness quotes on the back and give it to someone
  • Go to the library and whisper “Thank you” to the librarian
  • Take a flower to the office staff
  • Be on time for school

Wherever there is a human being; there is an opportunity for kindness
— Lucius Annaeus Seneca